Journal of Arachnology

List of all articles

Volume 49 Number 1

Abstract

In this study, we report a new interaction of the wasp Zatypota riverai Gauld, 1991 (Ichneumonidae) parasitizing the spider Cyclosa fililineata Hingston, 1932 (Araneidae) and we describe the modified spider web. Our results show that parasitized spiders build modified webs that are clearly different from normal capture webs. This modified web presents several additional lines at the center of the web, forming a disk-like structure that was also observed in modified webs of other host orb-weaving spiders. To our knowledge, Z. riverai (this study) and Z. kauros Gauld, 1984 are the only two species of the genus Zatypota that use spiders from different families as host. However, the unexpected host C. fililineata could be an accidental host, since in the same region there are two of the typical hosts, the theridiid spiders Anelosimus baeza Agnarsson, 2006 and Theridion sp.

Volume 49 Number 1

Abstract

We report observations over several field seasons of egg and juvenile guarding by males of a Central American species of cosmetid harvestman (Opiliones: Cosmetidae), Cynorta bromeliacia Goodnight & Goodnight, 1947. This represents only the second species of the family Cosmetidae that has been reported to exhibit paternal care. Importantly, we observed multiple instances of solitary male egg-guarding, including examples where eggs and young were at different stages of development. We also observed a few cases of mate guarding by a male at an oviposition site, where the female was near to eggs that appeared to have been recently laid. We discuss these observations in relation to the arboreal tendency of this species and speculate that oviposition sites are close to roosting sites or other such refuges for either the male or both sexes. Given the weak sexual dimorphism displayed by the species, we discuss that the externally visible characters we used to identify males are unlikely to provide any advantage in fighting off conspecific males. We also suspect that females may produce multiple clutches in this species, but this remains to be verified. Finally, we discuss how our findings at the end of the wet season may relate to the local microclimate and suggest further standardized observations throughout the year are required.

Volume 49 Number 1

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 3

Volume 48 Number 2

Volume 48 Number 2

Volume 48 Number 2